Posts by Pavlos Efraimidis

Pavlos S. Efraimidis is an Associate Professor in Algorithms and Director of the Algorithms and Privacy Research Unit (https://euclid.ee.duth.gr). He received his PhD in Informatics in 2000 from the University of Patras under the supervision of Paul Spirakis. His main work is on algorithms and his current research interests are in the fields of algorithmic game theory and algorithmic aspects of privacy. He has published over 35 refereed technical papers and book chapters, and has participated in 11 national and European research projects. His professional experience includes working as a researcher for the Computer Technology Institute (http://www.cti.gr/), and as a computer engineer in the high performance computing field (Parsytec Computer GmbH, Aachen, Germany) and the financial sector (ASYK - Athens Stock Exchange, Athens, Greece).

Moscow State University Team Wins World Finals of ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest

Three students from Moscow State University earn the title of 2018 ACM ICPC World Champions.

University Teams from Beijing and Tokyo also Recognized with Gold Medals

NEW YORK, April 19, 2018 – The 2018 World Finals of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC) culminated today at Peking University in Beijing, China. Three students from Moscow State University earned the title of 2018 World Champions. Teams from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Peking University and The University of Tokyo placed in second, third and fourth places and were recognized with gold medals in the prestigious competition.

Source: Moscow State University Team Wins World Finals of ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest

How social media helps scientists get the message across

New study suggests good research pushed through social media gets more citations.

By JENNIFER-ANNE PASCOE

Analyzing the famous academic aphorism ”publish or perish” through a modern digital lens, a group of emerging ecologists and conservation scientists wanted to see whether communicating their new research discoveries through social media—primarily Twitter—eventually leads to higher citations years down the road.

Turns out, the tweets are worth the time investment.

Source: How social media helps scientists get the message across

People Around World Want Unbiased News | Pew Research Center

A global median of 75% want their news media to be unbiased when covering political issues, yet many say the news media do a poor job of reporting on political issues fairly.

Source: People Around World Want Unbiased News | Pew Research Center

Βαριά πρόστιμα για τα προσωπικά δεδομένα | Επιχειρήσεις | Η ΚΑΘΗΜΕΡΙΝΗ

Βαριά πρόστιμα, σχεδόν εξοντωτικά, ειδικά για τις μεγάλες επιχειρήσεις, φέρνει ο νέος ευρωπαϊκός κανονισμός, που θα ισχύσει αυτόματα και στη χώρα μας από τον προσεχή Μάιο και αφορά το νέο θεσμικό πλαίσιο για την προστασία των προσωπικών δεδομένων.

Source: Βαριά πρόστιμα για τα προσωπικά δεδομένα | Επιχειρήσεις | Η ΚΑΘΗΜΕΡΙΝΗ

Facebook tries fighting fake news with publisher info button on links | TechCrunch

Facebook thinks showing Wikipedia entries about publishers and additional Related Articles will give users more context about the links they see. So today it’s beginning a test of a new “i” button on News Feed links that opens up an informational panel. “People have told us that they want more information about what they’re reading” Facebook product manager Sara Su tells TechCrunch. “They want better tools to help them understand if an article is from a publisher they trust and evaluate if the story itself is credible.”

Source: Facebook tries fighting fake news with publisher info button on links | TechCrunch

Cargo Cult Science

RICHARD P. FEYNMAN

Some remarks on science, pseudoscience, and learning how to not fool yourself. Caltech’s 1974 commencement address.

During the Middle Ages there were all kinds of crazy ideas, such as that a piece of rhinoceros horn would increase potency. (Another crazy idea of the Middle Ages is these hats we have on today—which is too loose in my case.) Then a method was discovered for separating the ideas—which was to try one to see if it worked, and if it didn’t work, to eliminate it. This method became organized, of course, into science. And it developed very well, so that we are now in the scientific age. It is such a scientific age, in fact, that we have difficulty in understanding how­ witch doctors could ever have existed, when nothing that they proposed ever really worked—or very little of it did.

Source: Cargo Cult Science