Posts by Pavlos Efraimidis

Pavlos S. Efraimidis is an Associate Professor in Algorithms and Director of the Algorithms and Privacy Research Unit (https://euclid.ee.duth.gr). He received his PhD in Informatics in 2000 from the University of Patras under the supervision of Paul Spirakis. His main work is on algorithms and his current research interests are in the fields of algorithmic game theory and algorithmic aspects of privacy. He has published over 35 refereed technical papers and book chapters, and has participated in 11 national and European research projects. His professional experience includes working as a researcher for the Computer Technology Institute (http://www.cti.gr/), and as a computer engineer in the high performance computing field (Parsytec Computer GmbH, Aachen, Germany) and the financial sector (ASYK - Athens Stock Exchange, Athens, Greece).

People Around World Want Unbiased News | Pew Research Center

A global median of 75% want their news media to be unbiased when covering political issues, yet many say the news media do a poor job of reporting on political issues fairly.

Source: People Around World Want Unbiased News | Pew Research Center

Βαριά πρόστιμα για τα προσωπικά δεδομένα | Επιχειρήσεις | Η ΚΑΘΗΜΕΡΙΝΗ

Βαριά πρόστιμα, σχεδόν εξοντωτικά, ειδικά για τις μεγάλες επιχειρήσεις, φέρνει ο νέος ευρωπαϊκός κανονισμός, που θα ισχύσει αυτόματα και στη χώρα μας από τον προσεχή Μάιο και αφορά το νέο θεσμικό πλαίσιο για την προστασία των προσωπικών δεδομένων.

Source: Βαριά πρόστιμα για τα προσωπικά δεδομένα | Επιχειρήσεις | Η ΚΑΘΗΜΕΡΙΝΗ

Facebook tries fighting fake news with publisher info button on links | TechCrunch

Facebook thinks showing Wikipedia entries about publishers and additional Related Articles will give users more context about the links they see. So today it’s beginning a test of a new “i” button on News Feed links that opens up an informational panel. “People have told us that they want more information about what they’re reading” Facebook product manager Sara Su tells TechCrunch. “They want better tools to help them understand if an article is from a publisher they trust and evaluate if the story itself is credible.”

Source: Facebook tries fighting fake news with publisher info button on links | TechCrunch

Cargo Cult Science

RICHARD P. FEYNMAN

Some remarks on science, pseudoscience, and learning how to not fool yourself. Caltech’s 1974 commencement address.

During the Middle Ages there were all kinds of crazy ideas, such as that a piece of rhinoceros horn would increase potency. (Another crazy idea of the Middle Ages is these hats we have on today—which is too loose in my case.) Then a method was discovered for separating the ideas—which was to try one to see if it worked, and if it didn’t work, to eliminate it. This method became organized, of course, into science. And it developed very well, so that we are now in the scientific age. It is such a scientific age, in fact, that we have difficulty in understanding how­ witch doctors could ever have existed, when nothing that they proposed ever really worked—or very little of it did.

Source: Cargo Cult Science

Special Report: Blockchain World – IEEE Spectrum

When Bitcoin was unleashed on the world, it filled a specific need. But it wasn’t long before people realized the technology behind Bitcoin—the blockchain—could do much more than record monetary transactions. That realization has lately blossomed into a dazzling and often bewildering array of startup companies, initiatives, corporate alliances, and research projects. Billions of dollars will hinge on what they come up with. So you should understand how blockchains work—and what could happen if they don’t.

Source: Special Report: Blockchain World – IEEE Spectrum

Israel Facebook: Mistranslated post creates security alert – BBC News

A post saying “good morning” in Arabic was reportedly mistranslated to say “attack them” in Hebrew.

Israeli police arrested a Palestinian man last week after a Facebook post he made saying “good morning” in Arabic was mistranslated to read “attack them” in Hebrew, local media have reported.

Police confirmed that the construction worker was briefly held under suspicion of incitement but was released as soon as the mistake was realised.

The post showed a photo of the worker next to a bulldozer in the West Bank.

Such vehicles have been used to attack Israelis in the past.

There is only one difference in lettering between the colloquial Arabic phrase for “good morning to you all” and “hurt them”, pointed out The Times of Israel.

 

Source: Israel Facebook: Mistranslated post creates security alert – BBC News

For $1000, anyone can purchase online ads to track your location and app use | UW News

Privacy concerns have long swirled around how much information online advertising networks collect about people’s browsing, buying and social media habits — typically to sell you something.

But could someone use mobile advertising to learn where you go for coffee? Could a burglar establish a sham company and send ads to your phone to learn when you leave the house? Could a suspicious employer see if you’re using shopping apps on work time?

The answer is yes, at least in theory. New University of Washington research, to be presented in a paper Oct. 30 at the Association for Computing Machinery’s Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society, suggests that for roughly $1,000, someone with devious intent can purchase and target online advertising in ways that allow them to track the location of other individuals and learn what apps they are using.

Source: For $1000, anyone can purchase online ads to track your location and app use | UW News